Revenge ON the Machines

No, we didn’t use the wrong preposition, city officials in San Francisco are indeed targeting the machines, or more specifically those who use machines instead of employees. The idea of hitting employers that utilize technology and automation (read: robots) with additional taxes for making their businesses more efficient (at the cost of employee jobs) first…

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Seattle Mayor Resigns, Millionaire Tax Challenged

Seattle Mayor Ed Murray, who dropped his campaign for reelection back in May, resigned this week as Mayor in the face of the fifth person (this one his younger cousin) coming forward to accuse him of child sexual abuse. Murray officially vacated the office effective at 5PM on Wednesday and City Council President Bruce Harrell…

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Employment Law Traps Abound

Whether the NLRB remains in business or not, the plethora of traps that unwitting small businessmen and women can find themselves caught in shows no signs of shrinking. Here are a couple of issues to ponder. Under recent court rulings in both Connecticut and Massachusetts, employers may be sued for not making a reasonable accommodation…

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Scheduling Law Takes Hold in Oregon

Oregon became the first state in the nation to impose scheduling mandates and penalties on private retail, hospitality and food services employers when democratic Governor Kate Brown signed Senate Bill 828 into law this week. The “Fair Workweek” law mandates that employers with more than 500 employees provide a “good faith estimate” of hours and…

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Protecting Franchisee Equity in California – and Beyond

Editor’s note: This month, Independent Joe offers an updated look at the legal impact from California’s Franchsie Relations Act, which has been covered extensively in this magazine. Franchise attorney Peter Lagarias provides this review of the statutory changes and how they affect Dunkin’ Donuts franchise owners. The landmark California Franchise Relations Act (CFRA), which went…

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A Tale of Two Wage Studies

There continues to be much debate around the country about the wisdom of increasing minimum wages and how big an increase can be before it becomes detrimental to the local economy and the very workers the increase is supposed to help. Well, two recent studies of the impact on Seattle employees of the Seattle minimum…

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Scheduling Mandates Spreading

The latest fad being foisted upon small business retailers and fast food employers – predictive scheduling – continues to spread to new areas around the country. The state of Oregon is now seriously entertaining enacting a law that would dictate how and when small businesses could schedule their employees to work. The Oregon Senate last…

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Paid Leave, Wage Trigger Approaching

The July 4th holiday may be one we all look forward to, but please be aware that July 1st is the trigger date for a number of new minimum wage increases as well as paid leave mandates in cities, counties and states around the country. This following listing is nowhere near all-inclusive, but just some…

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Good for the Goose, Not the Gander

As we’ve advised over recent months, under the banner of pay equity, many more cities and states have begun prohibiting employment questions about an applicant’s salary history and that ripple continues. Most recently, the state of Delaware has joined the list of those banning any salary history questions! But now comes California, which long ago…

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Pay Equity Law Signed in Oregon

Some number of months ago, it started as a prohibition on employers asking job applicants their salary history. Since that time, it has been transformed into the latest progressive campaign to right past wrongs and it now goes by the name Pay Equity. Oregon is the latest state to enact a Pay Equity Law when…

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