There are now 9 individual states that have enacted legislation declaring that franchisors are not to be considered “joint-employers”.  Oklahoma became the latest to join that group when Governor Mary Fallin signed SB. 1496 on May 24.  The Oklahoma law essentially provides blanket protection that states franchisors “shall not be considered the employer of a franchisee or a franchisee’s employees.”  Further, it goes on to state that “employees of a franchisee shall not be considered employees of the franchisor neither shall the employees of a franchisor be considered employees of a franchisee.”  Oklahoma joins Georgia, Indiana, Louisiana, Michigan, Tennessee, Texas, Utah, and Wisconsin as states that have enacted laws to limit the application of a new joint-employer definition. Some go beyond the traditional definition and in the face of the law of unintended consequences, are we so focused on helping franchisors avoid NLRB joint-employer status that we’re giving carte blanche power and protection for them to become “joint-employers” without any of the responsibility??  Just a question we constantly need to consider . . .