Wyoming Welcomes Veterans

We may not often hear of legislative activities coming out of the state of Wyoming, but the home of Old Faithful this month enacted legislation that allows for a private employer to grant hiring preferences for veterans and the spouses of disable or deceased veterans.  The law provides that the granting of a preference based…

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Utah and Wisconsin Ban Joint-Employer

Speaking of the egregious joint-employer ruling, two more states have enacted laws that strictly prohibit the application of the NLRB joint-employer definition within their boundaries.  Utah Governor Gary Herbert is expected to sign H.116, which specifies that no franchisee or employee of a franchisee shall be considered an employee of the franchisor for any purpose…

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What’s Brewing: Calorie labeling, Minimum wage, Scheduling

It may seem hard these days for Dunkin’ Donuts franchise owners to catch a break, with everyone from the federal government down to the local city council taking aim at the quick service restaurant industry. But Dunkin’ and other franchise owners got a big reprieve recently when the Food and Drug Administration gave the boot…

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Two Words that Changed the Face of Franchising

For four years – between 2011 and 2015 – a group of business owners representing the biggest names in franchising joined with a team of lawyers and consultants to amend the California franchise law and level the playing field in a sector of the U.S. economy responsible for nearly $500 billion in gross domestic product.…

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Minimum Wage Hikes Alive and Well

Lest we forget, the push for increased minimum wages continues around the country with two more being enacted within the past couple of weeks.  On the west coast, Oregon became the latest state to buy into it when the Oregon House passed Senate bill 1532 and Governor Kate Brown promised to sign it into law. …

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Minimum Wage Heading to Ballots

Often going hand-in-hand with paid sick leave, the push for increased minimum wages across the country continues unabated.  San Diego City Councilors voted last week to put an incremental minimum wage increase, including a mandated 5 days annual sick leave for all employees, on the ballot for the June 7 presidential primary election.  The increase…

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New Mexico Upholds Employee Firing for Marijuana

As more states authorize the use of marijuana for medical purposes, the body of law establishing parameters to govern its use becomes more important and far-reaching.  In a recent decision, the termination of an employee in New Mexico who legally used marijuana for a medical condition was upheld by the court.  Notwithstanding that the employee…

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IFA Appeals Seattle Discrimination to SCOTUS

The International Franchise Association (IFA), which filed suit in 2014 against the City of Seattle after it passed a $15 minimum wage law that discriminates against the franchise business model, has appealed the dismissal of the case, subsequently upheld by the US 9th Circuit Court of Appeals, to the Supreme Court of the United States…

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Airports and Minimum Wages

Speaking of Seattle and minimum wage, you will recall that the city of Sea-Tac in Washington state, encompassing the Seattle-Tacoma International Airport, was the first in the nation to adopt a $15 minimum.  Not to be outdone, two Massachusetts legislators think airport workers need special protection and have filed bills (SD 2307 / H 3923)…

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States, Cities Still Looking to Raise Minimums

Notwithstanding the lesson from the impending Wal-Mart closings (and what might have caused them), state and local officials continue to look to mandate low-income workers into prosperity by increasing the minimum wage.  Advocates in the state of Maine have succeeded in securing the required number of signatures to place a question on the November ballot…

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