Banned in Boston

That term actually originated back in the 17th century and mostly stemmed from the Puritan roots of Massachusetts’ earlier settlers. It generally referred to a literary work, song, picture or play that was prohibited from being distributed or exhibited in Boston because of “objectionable” content. Regrettably, it now more accurately illustrates the endless nanny-state leanings…

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Massachusetts Ballot Issues Advancing

The proponents are already claiming they’ve collected enough valid voter signatures in Massachusetts to put a couple of wage and paid leave proposals before the voters on the 2018 state ballot. The non-profit RaiseUp Massachusetts said last week that their wage ballot and paid leave measures each had more than double the required 64,750 valid…

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Franchisee Completes Circle by Returning to Root

Dennis Gramm knows Dunkin’. While the franchisee operates four stores in northwest suburban Chicago (with two more stores under construction), he also has a unique perspective amongst his peers, having spent 11 years on the corporate side of Dunkin’ Brands before becoming a franchise owner in 2007. “In the eyes of some of the legacy…

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Independent Joe #42 February/ March 2017

In some of its earliest iterations, it was referred to as yellow journalism. Back in the early days of this nation’s history, it manifested itself in so-called Pamphlets, where the writer would use a pseudonym and slander his political opponents with outrageous allegations – some having just a sliver of truth, others lacking even the…

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What’s Brewing: Payroll challenges, Menus, Labor Costs

Warning: A tidal wave of minimum wage laws and food labeling red tape may soon be headed your way. Dunkin’ and other quick service franchise owners are facing what is shaping up to be a challenging and unpredictable 2016. A no-holds-barred presidential race has pumped new energy into an array of activist causes, from the…

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Airports and Minimum Wages

Speaking of Seattle and minimum wage, you will recall that the city of Sea-Tac in Washington state, encompassing the Seattle-Tacoma International Airport, was the first in the nation to adopt a $15 minimum.  Not to be outdone, two Massachusetts legislators think airport workers need special protection and have filed bills (SD 2307 / H 3923)…

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States, Cities Still Looking to Raise Minimums

Notwithstanding the lesson from the impending Wal-Mart closings (and what might have caused them), state and local officials continue to look to mandate low-income workers into prosperity by increasing the minimum wage.  Advocates in the state of Maine have succeeded in securing the required number of signatures to place a question on the November ballot…

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Franchisees Celebrate K-Cup Deal

In the summer of 2007, news broke in the city of Cincinnati – the home of consumer brand giant Procter & Gamble – and in Boston – the home of Dunkin’ Donuts. P&G was to begin selling Dunkin’ coffee in supermarkets and other retail outlets. No longer did a customer have to go to a…

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More Minimum Wage Issues At The State Level

As if Seattle and San Francisco aren’t doing enough to damage an already shaky economy, there are a number of equally egregious and challenging proposals in a host of State Houses across the country and especially on both coasts.  California State Senator Mark Leno has his own minimum wage bill (SB 935) pending in the…

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