SEIU Wants NLRB Clock Turned Back

Through the veil of the Fight for $15 movement that it has bankrolled, SEIU demanded that two of the republican members of the National Labor Relations Board recuse themselves this week from decisions involving a pending settlement of a major McDonald’s case. The settlement was rejected by an NLRB administrative law judge last month and…

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NLRB Reaffirms ALJ Appointments

Speaking of the NLRB and decisions by Administrative Law Judges (ALJs), last week the Board unanimously ruled that its process for appointing administrative law judges falls in line with a recent Supreme Court decision on the subject. In Lucia v. SEC , SCOTUS found that the process used by the Security and Exchange Commission for…

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Discount Meals Don’t Violate FLSA

The US Ninth Circuit Court of Appeals has upheld a lower court ruling in Rodriguez v Taco Bell Corp. that requiring employees to eat employer-discounted meals in the restaurant violates neither the US Fair Labor Standards Act (FLSA) or California Employment Law. Taco Bell offers its employees discounted meals for their required 30-minute meal breaks…

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Massachusetts Restricts Non-compete Clauses

At the close of the legislative session, Massachusetts lawmakers passed a law prohibiting the use of non-compete agreements for certain employees and dramatically restricted their use for others. The Massachusetts Non-competition Agreement Act – Section 21 of the Economic Stimulus bill was signed into law last week by Governor Charlie Baker and, effective October 1,…

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Sexual Harassment on Two Fronts

A couple of important dates are coming up relative to employer responsibilities regarding sexual harassment in New York over the next 2 months. First off in New York City, the Stop Sexual Harassment Act, a series of bills signed into law by Mayor de Blasio on May 9, requires all employers beginning on September 6,…

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Palmetto State Posters Too

Not too dissimilar from its New York counterpart, a similar requirement will also take effect next month in South Carolina, of all places. The South Carolina legislature passed the Pregnancy Accommodations Act earlier this year and it was signed into law by Governor Henry McMaster on May 17. The Act amends the South Carolina Human…

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Windy City Blowing Anti-Business?

So it would seem that Chicago is intent on implementing as many policies as possible that win votes, but do little to grow and improve a region’s economy and business climate. First off, last month we noted an initiative by Chicago Alderman Ameya Pawar to begin a Universal Basic Income (UBI) pilot program won support…

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Overspending Has a Price

Talking about Other People’s Money, the state of West Virginia has a completely different view of the propriety of spending tax dollars without regard to the taxpayer. This past week, the West Virginia House of Delegates adopted 11 articles of impeachment against all four remaining justices of the state Supreme Court. The fifth justice resigned…

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New Jersey Will Pay the Pickets

One week ago, New Jersey Governor Phil Murphy signed into law A3861, a bill that will allow for striking workers in the Garden State to collect unemployment benefits when they are out of work because they are on strike against their employer! Under the legislation, which had previously passed the legislature but was vetoed by…

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Miscellaneous

Talk of driving up costs on business provides a great segue to Papa John’s Pizza, where in light of the controversy surrounding founder John Schnatter, the brand negotiated with the Papa Johns Franchise Association and the Franchise Advisory Council to develop an assistance program for franchisees. In light of the fact that same store sales…

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