File photo | Associated Press

File photo | Associated Press

In the wake of Ray Rice and the infamous elevator video, followed closely by Adrian Peterson using a “switch” on his 4-year old son among other news reports, it is not surprising that domestic violence is getting much attention now.  The Massachusetts legislature, however acted more than a month ago to provide domestic violence victims with some employment liberties if needed.  In mid-August, Governor Deval Patrick signed a new law that grants employees of public and private companies with at least 50 employees up to 15 days of leave in any 12 month period if the employee, or his or her family member, is a victim of domestic violence or abuse.  The law essentially prohibits an employer from discharging or discriminating against any employee for exercising their rights under this statute or from interfering with an employee’s rights.   In Connecticut, current law covers employers with 3 or more employees and requires employers to allow an employee victim of domestic violence to take paid or unpaid leave during any 12 month period to seek care or counseling, obtain victim services, relocate or participate in civil or criminal proceedings.  Under the Connecticut law, employers may limit unpaid leave to 12 days per year.