DoorDash Sues NYC Again

We advised a couple of weeks ago that the NYC City Council had adopted a 15% cap on third-party delivery fees, and shortly after the ink on that ordinance dried, DoorDash and other third-party delivery firms challenged the ordinance in court. While that challenge is pending, DoorDash also filed a separate suit this week, challenging…

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Illinois Puts Union Amendment on ‘22 Ballot

In the context of the ongoing push to ease union organizing (think PRO Act, Biden being ‘most union-friendly president’ in history, NLRB becoming more advocacy-oriented, etc.), the state of Illinois does not intend to be left behind. In fact, earlier this year, the legislature passed a joint resolution to place a constitutional amendment on the…

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Third-Party Deliveries Drawing Ire

In California, a proposal by San Diego Assemblywoman Lorena Gonzalez would require food delivery companies to provide customers – and restaurants – with an itemized breakdown of third-party fees and commissions for each transaction. Additionally, AB 286 would also allow restaurants to set the price of food and drink sold through delivery companies. The bill…

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New York City Caps Delivery Fees

New York City didn’t file any lawsuits, but last week the City Council formally adopted a cap of 15% on third party delivery fees and sent the legislation to Mayor Bill de Blasio for his signature. The law, if signed by de Blasio as expected, will make permanent the 15% cap imposed last year on…

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Mass. Governor Proposes $1B in UI Relief

Last week, Massachusetts Governor Charlie Baker proposed a supplemental budget that would utilize $1 Billion in federal pandemic relief funds to replenish the state Unemployment Insurance Trust Fund. During the height of the coronavirus pandemic with its accompanying layoffs, shutdowns and business closures, the Unemployment Insurance Trust Fund, funded by a payroll tax on employers,…

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With an Eye on the Calendar

As we get ready to close out the summer months, there are a number of dates approaching where new laws – or changes to existing laws – will become effective that you need to be aware of. We’ve previously advised you that effective September 1, the sexual harassment laws in the state of Texas will…

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New York City, Frisco Require Vaccine for Indoor Dining

The Big Apple and San Francisco are leading the charge to require vaccine “passports” in order to dine indoor at restaurants within the two cities. The New York dictate actually became effective this past Monday, August 16 however, formal enforcement is not set to begin until September 13. In response to the Executive Order by…

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Minimum wage on state ballots in 2022

Notwithstanding the economic realities of the ongoing labor shortage and the BLS data showing wages exceeding $15 per hour in supermarkets and restaurants  across the country, advocates continue to push. In Nebraska, a host of community organizations announced the launch of Raise the Wage Nebraska, a 2022 ballot initiative campaign that would increase the current…

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Tipping and The Minimum Wage

It seems there are some out there who refuse to acknowledge that the tip credit and the minimum wage can and should be allowed to peacefully co-exist. As a case in point, in the wake of President Biden’s Executive Order raising the minimum wage for federal contractors to $15 an hour, DOL issued a proposed…

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Fair Chance Laws and Criminal Background Checks

New York City and the state of Maine aren’t usually packaged together relating political issues, but they are both tightening up employer options regarding criminal background checks. New York City of course, already restricted an employer’s ability to inquire into an applicant’s criminal history, but back in January, passed additional amendments that just took effect…

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