Laura MacKinnon enjoys a minty delight at the Mill Cove Tim Hortons.

Laura MacKinnon enjoys a minty delight at the Mill Cove Tim Hortons.

Christa Hoyland reports at QSR Magazine that Tim Hortons and Cold Stone Creamery now have plans for 100 co-branded U. S. locations — 50 for each chain — up from the 50 announced in June, according to a story in The Buffalo News.

 

The stores share side-by-side counter space and integrated kitchen operations, one of the benefits of dual-branding.

 
Cold Stone has co-branded with other companies outside of the United States, including Denmark’s leading chocolate manufacturer and retailer Sv. Michelsen for 13 international co-branded locations in Scandanavia.
 
The companies’ efforts meet what experts say are the strategic points of a successful co-branded business model: complementary dayparts, expanded product mix and broader consumer appeal to eliminate the veto vote, especially in large groups.
 
From The Buffalo News:
“According to executives, Tim Hortons typically does its highest sales during the morning hours, while Cold Stone Creamery tends to do more business in the evening. As much as Tim Hortons tried to shore up its later business by offering lunch and dinner fare such as soups and sandwiches, combining the two is an attempt at securing a more steady traffic flow.
 
“‘It made sense operationally . . . It’s a great match,'” said David Clanachan, chief operations officer at Tim Hortons.
Yum! Brands is a good example of pairing complementary concepts and has 4,500 multibranded U.S. locations. Leading QSR chains Wendy’s and Arby’s, now owned by the same parent company, recently announced they will be testing dual-branded units in the United States, following an international franchise agreement for 135 co-branded sites in the Middle East and North Africa over the next 12 years.